LISS panel informatie-evenement

Op 20 mei, van 13:00 tot 15:00 uur, organiseren ODISSEI en CentERdata een informatie-evenement over onderzoek met het LISS panel. Tijdens deze middag introduceren verschillende sprekers het LISS panel en lichten ze de onderzoeksmogelijkheden toe. Twee onderzoekers presenteren hun LISS projecten die zijn gefinancierd door de ODISSEI LISS grant. Het evenement is geschikt voor onderzoekers die geïnteresseerd zijn in werken met het LISS panel, waaronder onderzoekers die een aanvraag willen indienen voor de LISS grant call die opent in mei. Bekijk het volledige programma hieronder (Engels).

Lees meer over het LISS panel en de LISS panel grant op de LISS panel toegang pagina.

Programme:

13.00-13.15: Introducing the LISS panel, Prof. dr. Marcel Das (CentERdata)

Marcel Das is the director at CentERdata and a member of the Management Board of ODISSEI. He will give an introduction on how the LISS panel is organized, what the scientific importance of the panel is and how you can use it for your own research.

13.15-13.25: The ODISSEI LISS grant, Kasia Karpinska (ODISSEI)

Kasia Karpinska is Scientific Manager at ODISSEI. She will introduce the ODISSEI LISS grant.

13.25-13.55: Research with LISS: “Objective neighbourhood characteristics or perceptions? What is more important in affecting individual outcomes?”, Heleen Janssen (TU Delft)

Janssen will present her research with the LISS panel for which she received a LISS grant in 2019. Find the abstract below.

13.55-14.00: Break

14.00-14.30: Research with LISS: “Skype or skip? Motivations, online self-disclosure, and well-being in online medical consultations”, Nadine Bol (Tilburg University)

Bol will present her research with the LISS panel for which she received a LISS grant in 2018. Find the abstract below.

14.30-14.45: New and innovative research in the  LISS panel, Joris Mulder (CentERdata)

Joris Mulder is the coordinator of the LISS panel and a researcher at CentERdata. He will present the possibilities of new and innovative research in the LISS panel by discussing several examples of earlier fielded research projects.

14.45: General Q&A on using the LISS panel and the LISS grant


Research project descriptions:

“Objective neighbourhood characteristics or perceptions? What is more important in affecting individual outcomes?” by Heleen Janssen & Maarten Ham

Perceptions of neighbourhood conditions – no matter how accurate or biased – can have real consequences for neighbourhoods and individuals, and might even be more important than the objective characteristics. This project investigates how important these neighbourhood perceptions are for understanding individual outcomes, and will provide insight in how these perceptions are shaped. Understanding the impact of perceptions can help to design better policies, which are often based on objectively measured characteristics of residential environments. The LISS panel data will be linked to the CBS microdata to construct objective neighbourhood characteristics for all panel members at multiple geographical scales.

This presentation will highlight the first study from this project focusing on relative deprivation and life satisfaction. We look at individual’s economic position in the neighbourhood in objective and subjective terms. This is the difference between being and feeling deprived relative to neighbours. We find that objective and subjective relative deprivation are only moderately related and that perceptions of relative deprivation are more important for life satisfaction.

 “Skype or skip? Motivations, online self-disclosure, and well-being in online medical consultations” by Nadine Bol & Marjolijn Antheunis

Advances in computer-mediated communication have created new ways for doctors and patients to communicate, for example via video conferencing tools. The covid-19 pandemic forced a switch from regular face-to-face consultations to video consultations. As patients are often required to share intimate information about themselves during medical consultations, it is important to understand people’s willingness to disclose personal information during video consultations. We examined how people decide (not) to share intimate information and how they feel afterwards. We asked people to imagine having a video consultation with a doctor. We found that when people perceive benefits of video consultations and have trust in video conferencing tools, they are more willing to self-disclose. Also, when people are concerned about their privacy and expect communication problems, they are less willing to self-disclose. People who were more willing to self-disclose experienced more relief and less stress afterwards. However, when people were asked to reveal physically intimate information (i.e., showing their hip for which they have to undress), they were less likely to do so and experienced more stress as a result. This study shows that video consultations could be effective, but not for situations in which patients need to share physically intimate information.


Relevante Links